Decorating the White House, 2015 -Part 1

Floral arrangement in the library
Floral arrangement in the library

Decorating the White House is every designers dream come true. I had a second chance to take part in this one of a kind volunteer event again in 2015! Read about my first time in 2011 at Decorating the White House for Christmas. Anyone can apply by going online to https://www.whitehouse.gov/, filling out the form and add a short essay with pictures of your work and by October you will find out if you made the cut. I’m sure that the White House Social Office gets thousands of applications from all over the country and it must be tough to choose the lucky people.

When I opened the acceptance email from the White House Social Office, I couldn’t believe my luck in participating again!

This season’s theme A Timeless Tradition, inspires visitors to celebrate deeply rooted Christmas traditions while also creating new memories. Combining the old with the new was the trademark this year. From my time working in 2011, the decorations just keep getting more elaborate and over the top with stunning displays of creativity. Sixty-two firs fill the White House with over 70,000 ornaments to create the magic.

Work, Work, and More Work!

It takes tons of volunteer hours to make the magic happen. I spent a week in D.C. starting on Thanksgiving evening in a hotel a couple of blocks away from the White House. Everything is at my expense- hotel, transportation, time, and most meals (the White House fed us very well at lunch). Taking on this task is a real commitment of time and money but well worth it. Everyone who accepts the challenge knows that this is a chance of a lifetime. Getting up early to meet at 6:30 AM every morning isn’t my idea of fun normally, but when you’re on a mission to decorate the White House, everyone is so psyched that you jump out of bed ready to go! Five days of decorating later, the White House treats you and a guest to an evening reception with such a fanfare of food and entertainment that you gasp as you see everything in place.

My daughter and I in front of the Blue Room tree which I helped decorate at the volunteer reception
My daughter and I in front of the Blue Room tree I helped decorate at the volunteer reception

Tour of the White House-Ground Floor

Ground floor of the White House, from Wikipedia
Ground floor of the White House, from Wikipedia

A giant penguin family greets you as you enter the East Visitor Entrance. When you visit the White House, there are layers of security to go through. I had a gorgeous formal invite as a keepsake but did not need that in hand to enter. Standing in line for two plus hours until the gates opened ensured that I was close to the front of the line to get an early peek and take some memorable pictures before it gets too crowded.

Giant penguins greet you at the visitors entrance
Giant penguins greet you at the visitors entrance
Baby penguins perch in a giant sled
Baby penguins perch in a giant sled

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As you enter the East Landing, a sea of snowflakes shimmer overhead. Each of the fifty-six states and territories are represented with a dangling snowflake suspended from chicken wire. Your wintry stroll continues along the whole length of the East Colonnade until you tear your eyes off the ceiling and glance to the left into the East Colonnade garden. There, an army of snow people gaze in at you. I stopped to take pictures of this magical constellation of unique frozen snow people with the traditional smiley faces and scarves.

The East Colonnade is lined with framed photos of all the first families
The East Colonnade is lined with framed photos of all the first families

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Smiling snow people are scattered in the garden
Smiling snow people are scattered in the garden

Again, there are fifty-six snow people representing all the states and territories. The snow people were extremely heavy and awkward to move around in the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. Redesigned in the Kennedy Administration with Littleleaf linden trees and Kennedy saucer magnolias bordered by low hedges of boxwood and American Holly, events and parties are frequently held in this semi-formal garden.

Military tree decorated with air mail letters, stuffed with card stock, folded, and stapled to make garlands and wreaths
Military tree decorated with air mail letters, stuffed with card stock, folded, and stapled to make garlands and wreaths

Dedicated to serving members of the military, and those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country, the East Landing greets you with a gorgeous tree and mailboxes. Visitors are invited to pause and send a message of thanks to our troops with the array of mailboxes and air mail envelopes. Volunteers spent many hours making garlands and wreaths out of the airmail envelopes by stuffing them with card stock and stapling them together.

Garlands made out of air mail envelopes
Garlands made of air mail envelopes

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East Garden Room

A place for the furry residents is next. Sunny and Bo, the First Pets, are both Portuguese Water dogs. I pet and admired the dogs during my time at the White House. The dog-themed tree, giant dog bed, tennis ball wreaths and trees were the perfect accessories for them. Constructed of over 55,000 feet of black yarn that was wound into 7,000 pom-poms, larger-than-life Sunny and Bo greeted visitors to the White House. These pom-poms were the result of many hours of work by volunteers!

Dog area had tennis ball trees
Dog area had tennis ball trees

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The Night Before Christmas poem hung on the wall, altered to reflect the antics of the First Dogs.

Twas the holiday season inside of these walls, 

And the first Dogs were prancing, playing fetch down the halls.

The First Lady was bustling with holiday cheer, 

Decorating for visitors soon to be here.

Bo and Sunny were snuggled quite deep in their beds, 

While visions of tennis balls danced in their heads. 

So sleepy were these Portuguese Water Dogs, 

The pups fell asleep much like the giant yule logs.

When out on the South Lawn there arose such a clatter, 

They ran to the West Wing to see what was the matter

through the West Colonnade they both flew like a flash,

Pushed open the doors, to the Rose Garden they dashed.

They barked the alarm, but to their relief,

‘Twas the return of the Commander in Chief.

Up high in the sky they saw Marine One, 

They knew what this meant-a night of great fun.

With a gleam in his eye, POTUS greeted his pets, 

Knowing holidays with friends is good as it gets.

The First Lady joined them as they gazed at the snow,

What a magical moment for Sunny and Bo.

To all the guests who are headed this way,

The family sends warms wishes for the best holiday!

Library

Containing works of fiction to first-hand accounts of important moments in our Nation’s history, books dominate the library’s walls. Gold covered books were added to the shelves to add a holiday touch and decorations placed on the tables to make the library a festive place. A holiday forest of Christmas trees were arrayed and decorated to celebrate the American story.

Scenes from the library
Scenes from the library

Vermeil Room

Displaying a collection of gold-plated silver, the Vermeil Room or sometimes known as the Gold Room, displays several First Lady portraits and contained one of the most striking Christmas displays. Patchwork stuffed teddy bears, both large and small, with beautiful shell trees and miniature scenes were whimsical and creative. Originally, the Vermeil Room was used as a staff work room for polishing silver and storage.

There are lots of mantels in the White House to decorate and this is one of the most charming interpretations with patchwork teddy bears
There are lots of mantels in the White House to decorate and this is one of the most charming interpretations with patchwork teddy bears
Heaps of wrapped packages decorate the hearth
Heaps of wrapped packages decorate the hearth

White House

 

White House

China Room

Used to display Presidential china in built-in cabinetry against a bright red background, the China Room is one of the most beautiful and memorable rooms in the house – without any decorations. The china collection is arranged chronologically beginning to the right of the fireplace on the east wall.  A good portion of the china goes back to the early nineteenth century.

The China Room has one of my favorite portraits at the White House; This one is of First Lady Grace Coolidge with her beloved white collie Rob Roy
The China Room has one of my favorite portraits at the White House; This one is of First Lady Grace Coolidge with her beloved white collie Rob Roy painted in 1924
The China Room's dramatic mantel trimmed in silver
The China Room’s dramatic English neoclassical mantel trimmed in silver

 

Diplomatic Reception Room

The Diplomatic Reception Room is one of three oval rooms in the White House and located next to the China Room. Used as a reception room for foreign ambassadors, the most interesting feature is that a previously unused chimney was opened up in 1935, and a new mantel and fireplace installed for Franklin Roosevelt’s famous “fireside chats.” The room has four doors leading to the Map Room, the Center Hall, the China Room, and a vestibule that leads to the South Lawn.

First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy had the room papered with antique French scenic wallpaper produced by Jean Zuber et Cie in Rixheim (Alsace), France c. 1834. The Zuber wallpaper, titled Scenes of North America, was printed from multiple woodblocks, and features scenes of Boston Harbor, the Natural Bridge in Virginia, West Point, New York, Niagara Falls, and New York Harbor. The sweeping panorama on the elliptical walls provide a sense of space negating the lack of windows.
First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy had the room papered with antique French scenic wallpaper produced by Jean Zuber et Cie in Rixheim (Alsace), France c. 1834. The Zuber wallpaper, titled Scenes of North America, was printed from multiple woodblocks, and features scenes of Boston Harbor, the Natural Bridge in Virginia, West Point, New York, Niagara Falls, and New York Harbor. The sweeping panorama on the elliptical walls provide a sense of space negating the lack of windows. From wikipedia
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Here I am with my daughter who was my guest for the party in the Diplomatic Reception Room
Details of the mantel decorations in the Diplomat Room
Details of the mantel decorations in the Diplomat Reception Room
Details of the ornaments used
Details of the ornaments used in the Diplomatic Reception Room
When you enter the center hall in the lower level of the White House, the atmosphere is magical with all the hanging silver bells
When you enter the center hall in the lower level of the White House, the atmosphere is magical with all the hanging silver bells arranged on the historic vaulted ceiling
I took this photo of a framed picture of Obama entering the central hall of a past Christmas
I took this photo of a framed picture hanging the the White House of President Obama entering the central hall a past Christmas

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Next up: Entering the historic upper level of the White House -East Room, Dining Room, Red Room, Green Room, and Blue Room and the volunteer reception with the incredible gingerbread house

 

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14 Replies to “Decorating the White House, 2015 -Part 1”

  1. Thank you for sharing the beauty with all the Garden Club members, Claire. Elegant is the word to describe all the elves’ work.

  2. Many thanks for sharing all the information and photos! Looks like you had a great time and stories to tell!

    I had the pleasure of helping decorate the East Room of the White House last year, 2014. Perhaps I will apply next year as I applied this year without response. I did have a Dear friend from Kansas City, Mo in your group and another Dear friend, from Lenexa, KS that went along with her for the trip. I worked with the latter in the White House last year. We shared laughs and coffee across the street from the hotel @ Peet’s.

    I’m am impressed with all of the decorating especially the Seashell tree! Thanks Again for sharing!
    I’m sorry that I didn’t get to meet you.
    Donna Shields
    Raleigh, NC

      1. Yes!!!….. both of them are such lovely ladies! They gifted me a book called ” Daily Joys”. I speak to Lana @ frequent intervals. Linda is difficult to reach as she is always on the go. What a small world we live in..LOL……. Donna

  3. Enjoyed the photos and all the background information you have given us. You are one special lady.

  4. Claire,
    What a wonderfully complete blog on the lower floors of the White House! I loved reliving it through you and Linda. What fun meeting you and finding out you know Donna Shields too!
    Beautifully done…
    Lana Hansen
    Lenexa,KS

      1. Claire, thank you so much for sharing your experiences at the White House this year. Your pictures are fantastic and I enjoyed seeing them with the wonderful decorations by some wonderful volunteers! An experience, I’m sure, you will never forget.

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