DIY Birdseed Ornaments

Bird Seed Ornaments
Bird Seed Ornaments

Crossing out several names on my Christmas list this year, I was left with a bird lover/watcher who I knew would appreciate homemade bird treat ornaments. Feeding hungry songbirds in winter is a great way for people to interact with nature and help birds get through the tough months of winter. Studies show that bird feeding produces significantly earlier egg laying dates, larger clutches of eggs, and higher chick weights across a wide range of bird species.

Bird Pecking at ornaments
Chickadee pecking at ornaments

My cookie cutters were drying on the counter top from cookie baking, and I decided to whip up a concoction of bird seed and gelatin and mold them into my favorite Christmas shapes, using  cookie cutters. A raffia hanger would complete the ornaments, so they could be hung from a nearby tree to enjoy watching the birds swooping in to eat. This project was so successful that I also branched out into making a wreath and other smaller shapes with cooking molds.

Ingredients for ornaments
Ingredients for ornaments

The process of making a super frugal hand-made gift with just bird seed, gelatin,  flour, corn syrup, and raffia, was done in an hour on a cold windy day. Laying out the ornaments to cure and air dry for a few days completed the process.  Requiring no skill and just a few ingredients, I made enough for myself also to enjoy. After hanging out my ornaments, I noticed the birds start to feed almost immediately.

I used every mold I had in the kitchen
I used every mold I had in the kitchen

Air dry your ornaments/wreaths for several days to harden
Air dry your ornaments/wreaths for several days to harden

I used a  general seed mix variety. You can also add dried/fresh fruit and meal worms, cracked corn, nuts, and pumpkin seeds, a great high fat source for songbirds.

nd cracked corn to the seed mixture
Add cracked corn and dried fruit to the seed mixture

When completed, pack the ornaments up attractively using burlap, tissue paper, and bows to show them off.

Attractively package up your ornaments
Attractively package up your ornaments
I added dried bay leaves and canella berries to add color
I added dried bay leaves and canella berries to add color to the gift package

Bird Seed Ornaments

Mix up bird seed with dried fruit, fresh cranberries, and mealworms for a nutritious snack for songbirds

Ingredients

  • 3-4 C Mixed Bird Seed Millet, Sunflower Seeds, Meal Worms, Cracked Corn, Peanuts, Dried Fruit, Nuts, Pumpkin Seeds
  • 1 Pkg of 4 Envelopes Unflavored Gelatin mixed into 3/4 C to 1 C warm water
  • 2 T Corn Syrup
  • 1/4 C Flour mixed into 1/3 C water

Instructions

  1. Spray your cookie cutters and/or bundt pan with non-stick spray and place on a foil covered cookie sheet. 

  2. Empty gelatin into a large bowl with warm water (1 Cup) until it forms a thick paste. Let this sit for 1 minute, stirring to dissolve. Add some more water if it is too thick.

    Dissolve gelatin in cold water
  3. Mix flour and water together in a small bowl to form a paste.

  4. Add corn syrup to the gelatin mixture, stirring.  Then add the flour paste, mixing thoroughly. This is the binder that gels the seeds together. It should be a thick gooey mass with some lumps. Add small amounts of water as needed.

  5. Mix in the bird seed, using just enough to cover all the bird seed.

  6. Fill the cookie cutters/wreath with the mixture and press into shape firmly. Don’t skimp this part- the more packed in you can get the cookie cutters and molds, the better they hold their shape. 

  7. Make a small hole with the skewer for the string or raffia in the ornaments. Leave the skewers in until the ornaments dry.

    Stick a skewer or dowel into the ornament to form a hanging hole
  8. Let cure/air dry for several days and they are ready to unmold. Do not double this recipe. I made two separate batches to make  4-5 ornaments and a wreath.  

  9. Let dry once you unmold for an additional day to harden. I did this in the cold air of outside.

Wreaths

I enjoyed making the ornaments so much that I made a batch to fill up a small bundt pan for a wreath. If you have gotten rid of all your bundt or jello molds, stop by a Goodwill for a cheap one. Before packing in the bird seed, I dropped dried  or fresh cranberries in the bottom to make an attractive and nutritious accent. Be sure to thoroughly spray the bundt pan with non-stick cooking spray to make it easy to unmold. Other small molds work, like custard and muffin tins.

Place fresh cranberries in the bottom of a bundt pan
Place fresh cranberries in the bottom of a bundt pan
Unmold onto a plate and let dry several days

Place the wreath in the fridge or outside to chill thoroughly and harden before unmolding it onto a plate. I didn’t put a hole through the wreath for a hanger as it is too heavy. Instead wrap and tie your hanger around the entire wreath before hanging. If the wreath feels too fragile to hang, I place it on my bird feeder tray flat.

Hang in a tree on a sunny dry day
Hang in a tree on a sunny dry day

 

If the day is rainy, bring your seed ornaments and wreaths in, as they will dissolve in the rain!! These will last about 10 days outside feeding your birds and yes, your squirrels too.

 

Miniature Christmas Garden Craze

 

Globe terrarium
Globe terrarium
Globe terrarium sitting on a Hopkins desk top
Globe terrarium sitting on a Hopkins desk top

Maybe it is just me. Since I had an order for 40 of my miniature gardens as gifts at the local Johns Hopkins for the staff of one of the hospitals, I am going crazy with Christmas decorating in miniature. Instead of  dreaming about sugarplums, I’m dreaming of miniature gardens in an endless line that I am decorating! I love making these small creations that people can enjoy for months to come.

I love this little footed terrarium for tiny scenes
I love this little footed terrarium for tiny scenes

For my popular posts on making miniature gardens, go to Miniature Gardens-Whimisical Creations, Fairy Gardens, and Fairytale Christmas.

Mini garden with gnome
Mini garden with gnome

It merely takes a small glass terrarium container, bonsai pot, or low terra cotta container and you can make your own. For materials, I use small Christmas balls, reindeer moss, miniatures, sheet moss, and small potted plants from a local nursery. I use either woodland plants for a moist container or succulents for a drier one.

Gnome home
Gnome home

For details on making gnome homes in a cut away pot, go to Gnome Home.  You need to cut a chunk out of a terra cotta pot to create this and I give you instructions on how to cut the pot.

Woodland garden
Woodland garden
Mini succulent garden
Mini succulent garden
A succulent container that you would keep on the dry side
A succulent container that you would keep on the dry side
A woodland Christmas scene that you would water a little more
A woodland Christmas scene that you would water a little more

All of the plants will get much larger and can be kept in bounds for at least a year. Transplanting and replanting would be in order when the plants grow too large for the container and you could keep the planter going for several years or more.

Christmas miniature garden
A larger Christmas garden
I used this Christmas tree ornament for a tiny snowman
I used this Christmas tree ornament for a tiny snowman

Step By Step

Step by step for making miniature gardens
Step by step for making miniature gardens
  • Place potting soil in container with drainage: Alternatively, if you have a glass type terrarium, place gravel in bottom with some horticultural charcoal ( few tablespoons, available at garden centers)

  •  Plant a variety of plants with different textures and colors, starting with the largest ones first; I used from 3 to 5 plants for each small garden

  • If a woodland garden, I like to place moss in between the plants to hide soil; If a succulent garden, place small gravel on surface

  • Place any pathways, ornaments, reindeer moss, or gnomes at the very end; I like to use colored glass chunks for added color

  • Water thoroughly until the soil is saturated and place in a filtered sun spot for woodland scenes and full sun for succulent ones

  • For care, I stick my finger down into the soil to see if it is moist or not; For succulent gardens in the winter water every few weeks, and for woodland ones, water about once a week, depending on how warm and dry your house is

007

 

Mini gardens dropped off at  Johns Hopkins
Mini gardens dropped off at Johns Hopkins