Build the Buzz-Beekeeping Revolution

Beekeeping

 

Beekeeping, especially urban beekeeping, is picking up steam and buzz! When I first attended my “Beekeeping Basics” class put on by the local beekeepers club twenty years ago, older men in coveralls dominated and the joke was that the average age of a beekeeper was “from 57 to dead”. As a younger woman in the class, I was definitely in the minority. Sticking with beekeeping for over twenty years has seen lots of changes in the apiary. A new generation of beekeepers have arrived which has injected a revolution in how beekeeping is practiced. Hipsters, young mothers, and middle-aged couples, have taken up the practice in greater numbers than ever before.

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Two young students picking up Nucs, a miniature starting beehive, for their college campus
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A newly developed bee hive seen at a state fair

The practice of “we have always done it like this,” is slowly but surely disappearing. Beekeepers with new ideas, energy, and ways of doing things are transforming the apiary yard to something that beekeepers from 50 years ago wouldn’t recognize. When problems started to arise 10 years ago with the advent of mites and colony collapse, beekeepers wasted time hoping to return to 1940’s beekeeping. The old guard still wishes that. But with the new crop of beekeepers, they don’t know the difference and attack the problems with renewed vigor and novel solutions.

Lots of new beekeepers are entering the field. This one has a crazy suit-a bathrobe!
Lots of new beekeepers are entering the field. This one has a crazy bee suit-a bathrobe!

Females Rule!

An apiary’s female dominated society should be especially attractive to women. Historically, people assumed that the bee queen was actually a “king”. Even Shakespeare referred to the head of the hive as a “king”. Females in a beehive basically do all the heavy lifting with the males kept around for only one thing-inseminating a queen bee.

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Women are increasingly becoming beekeepers in the traditionally male dominated field.  But this isn’t easy for young women because of the physical nature of beekeeping. Try bench pressing 65 to 75 pounds or more of dead weight! – which a full hive body of honey can weigh.

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Helping out my neighbors to set up their own hives

From a creature with a brain the size of a sesame seed, a working hive is incredibly diverse and organized and gets the job done efficiently. Pollinating one in three of our agricultural crops, honeybees are hugely important to our economy. But only until Colony Collapse Disorder in 2007 became publicized, did people sit up and take notice that bees were in trouble or realize that they were vital. A result of that realization is a huge welcome influx of brand new concerned beekeepers, most of them under thirty to start their own hives in concern for the environmental impact of the decline.

A busy hive with brood and honey
A busy hive with brood and honey

Newbees

A steep learning curve will hit any newbee, and even though I have kept bees for twenty years, I still feel new to the field. Disease, parasitic mites, low winter survival rates, and the high startup cost is still an issue, but I find that new beekeepers are enthusiastic and eager to learn. Inevitably, some people upon learning about the time and money involved drop out. But many are sticking with it and unlike a fair weather fan, they are in it for the long-term. Committed newbees really want to become beekeepers even after hearing about all the recent setbacks in the bee world. Check out my post on How to Jump Into the World of Beekeeping.

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Flow Hive

I’m sure everyone has heard of the IndieGoGo Flow Hive with its promise of simplifying the honey harvest by simply turning on the tap. So far, Flow Hive has set records for the largest international campaign ever on Indiegogo and was an Internet darling. But critics are railing against the Flow Hive as an expensive gimmick that over-simplifies beekeeping and doesn’t deal with the nitty gritty day-to-day basics. In reality, beekeeping is hard work that requires lots of steps to make sure that your honeybees are monitored and kept free of disease and healthy. The promotional material for Flow Hive makes beekeeping look so simple and easy that anyone could have a beehive in their backyard without any work. I reserve judgement until we look back on this in a few years time. Stay tuned for the results.

BroodMinder-Technology In Beekeeping

The broodMinder is a thin bluetooth enabled monitor that is inserted on top of the hives
The broodMinder is a thin bluetooth enabled monitor that is inserted on top of the hives

And technology has entered beekeeping. I am using BroodMinder which uses the latest in Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology and integrated circuit temperature and humidity chips, to monitor my hive. By placing the small bee resistant wrapped monitor with a battery on top of the frames, any heat and humidity created by the bees is recorded as it rises to the top of the hive. Relaying the information to an app on my phone, I can monitor how the hive is doing and even email it to myself. Yes, there is an app for everything!

There is nothing more discouraging than opening a dead hive in the spring
There is nothing more discouraging than opening a dead hive in the spring

If the temperature and humidity plummets during the winter, I will know that the beehive needs my help with supplemental feeding. See BroodMinder for more information. They are also developing a monitor that will weigh your hive. I would love this feature to inform me as to how much honey is being stored during the summer so you know the best time to harvest!

 

Full Disclosure: BroodMinder gave me a unit to test out, but I only post reviews about products that I really like and use.

 

Helpful Articles

Beekeeping 101

Installing Nucs-A Bee Package or Nuc?

Spinning Honey

Jump Into the World of Beekeeping

Honeybee Nuc

Making of a Queen

Bee Packages Are Here!

Swarming of the Bees

3 Replies to “Build the Buzz-Beekeeping Revolution”

  1. Thanks Claire,

    That was a great article and I think it is wonderful how bee keeping is evolving.
    If the BroodMinder can help you keep an “eye” on your bees then I say that is a
    really useful app! Good luck and I can’t wait to hear more about it.

    Joanne

  2. Always informative and as a garden writer/lecturer, I will continue to point out plants that bees are attracted to in my work. Thanks for the terrific info!

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